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Lebanon's educational decline: From excellence to chaos

1 min

Lebanon, once renowned for its educational excellence, now finds itself unable to organize end-of-year secondary school exams. 

Once a beacon of educational excellence, the country now struggles with a myriad of challenges that threaten the future of its youth © Mena Today 

Lebanon, once renowned for its educational excellence, now finds itself unable to organize end-of-year secondary school exams. 

This crisis is a stark illustration of the terrible situation plaguing the country. Financial shortages, lack of competence, and ineffective leadership have brought the education system to its knees.

On April 30, the Minister of Education announced the cancellation of the official Brevet exam and reduced the number of Baccalaureate exams for high school seniors, allowing optional subjects. This move has been criticized as a devaluation of the Baccalaureate, raising concerns about the quality and integrity of education in Lebanon.

"It is unacceptable, both educationally and psychologically, for students to endure such conditions. They need a conducive environment to effectively prepare for exams, especially considering the essential role of secondary education exams in facilitating the transition to universities, both locally and internationally," stated Oussama Arnaout, the secretary-general of the teachers' union, on Friday.

In addition to logistical and financial problems, political interference exacerbates the crisis. Islamist organizations Amal and Hezbollah, influenced by Iran, are pushing for the cancellation of exams, claiming they would disadvantage students in southern Lebanon. 

This region has been a hotspot of conflict, with Hezbollah attacking Israel since October 8.

The current examination crisis is yet another example of Lebanon's decline. 

Once a beacon of educational excellence, the country now struggles with a myriad of challenges that threaten the future of its youth. 

The inability to conduct essential exams underscores the broader collapse of state functions and the dire need for comprehensive reforms.

By Georges Maroun 

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