Skip to main content

Olympics-Macron says he has no doubt Russia will target Paris Olympics

1 min

French President Emmanuel Macron said on Thursday that he had no doubt Russia would malevolently target the Paris Olympics this summer.

French President Emmanuel Macron talks to children after their swimming performance during the inauguration of the Olympic Aquatics Centre (CAO), a multifunctional venue for the 2024 Paris Olympic Games construction site which is under the management of the "Metropole Grand Paris" in Saint-Denis, near Paris, April 4, 2024. Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes/Pool

French President Emmanuel Macron said on Thursday that he had no doubt Russia would malevolently target the Paris Olympics this summer.

"I have no doubt whatsoever, including in terms of information," Macron said in response to a reporter's question about whether he thought that Russia would try to target the Olympics.

Macron's comments, delivered at an event in Paris for the inauguration of the new Olympics aquatic centre, represent his most explicit acknowledgment to date of foreign threats to the security or smooth running of the games.

The Games will take places amid a complex global backdrop, with Russia's war in Ukraine and Israel's conflict with Hamas in Gaza complicating efforts to safeguard the Olympics.

Macron has in past months adopted a tougher stance against Russia, vowing that Moscow must be defeated, and has not ruled out that European troops may one day go to Ukraine, although he has made clear that France has no intention of instigating hostilities against Russia.

His government has also adopted a tougher line against alleged Russian disinformation efforts across Europe.

Earlier this week, Foreign Minister Stephane Sejourne said France will propose EU-wide level sanctions on those behind spreading disinformation amid what Paris sees as growing efforts by Russia to destabilise the bloc.

(Reporting by Benoit Van Overstraeten, writing by GV De Clercq and Gabriel Stargardter, editing by Inti Landauro and Richard Lough)

Reporting by Benoit Van Overstraeten

Tags

Related

Politics

What happens in a UK national election?

Britain will hold a national election on July 4 which opinion polls indicate will end 14 years of Conservative Party-led government, spanning one of the most turbulent periods in the country's modern political history.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Mena banner 4

To make this website run properly and to improve your experience, we use cookies. For more detailed information, please check our Cookie Policy.

  • Necessary cookies enable core functionality. The website cannot function properly without these cookies, and can only be disabled by changing your browser preferences.