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Progress in negotiations for South Lebanon situation

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Negotiations regarding the situation in South Lebanon are advancing swiftly, notably following Beirut's expressed willingness and Hezbollah Secretary-General Hassan Nasrallah's openness, reports L'Orient Le Jour on Thursday.

The village of Ghajar © Mena Today 

Negotiations regarding the situation in South Lebanon are advancing swiftly, notably following Beirut's expressed willingness and Hezbollah Secretary-General Hassan Nasrallah's openness, reports L'Orient Le Jour on Thursday.

The announcement of the agreement's details and its implementation may be postponed until after the Gaza war ends.

Nevertheless, the efforts of U.S. special envoy for energy security, Amos Hochstein, who begins his tour of Lebanon on Thursday, have reached an advanced stage, focusing on negotiating the finest details.

The issue is no longer solely tied to the demarcation of land borders, namely Israel's withdrawal from the 13 points of contention and a resolution to the disputed Chebaa Farms, as well as the B1 point on the coast.

What Washington desires is a lasting stability in the border region, underpinned by a comprehensive political package including the election of a President, the formation of a government, and the commencement of economic recovery. This would contribute to maintaining stability in South Lebanon and the security of the region.

A plan is being discussed concerning the finalization of the land demarcation and the return of the northern part of the village of Ghajar under Lebanese sovereignty.

The Lebanese side has already chosen a name for this portion of the village, "Khraj el-Mari," which translates to "the outskirts of el-Mari," a village located slightly further north.

Discussions are also ongoing regarding how to address the issue of residents in this region who wish to remain in Israel.

The agreement also envisions resolving the Chebaa Farms and Kfarchouba Hills issue, which are occupied by Israel, claimed by Lebanon, and considered by the international community to be part of the Syrian Golan Heights.

However, given the current context, it is challenging to believe in the success of these discussions.

Since October 8, Hezbollah, funded by Iran, has been launching daily attacks on Israel from the border area.

According to UN Security Council Resolution 1701, no armed elements should be present in this zone, but rather 30 kilometers south of the Litani River. The Shiite militia has never adhered to the agreement with the UN.

In any case, if an agreement on land demarcation is reached, Hezbollah will first need to seek Iran's permission, as Tehran effectively controls Lebanon.

Iran bears partial responsibility for the political and economic collapse of the Cedar Country.

By Antoine Ghazal in Beirut 

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