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Tribal mediation

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Violent clashes between rival armed groups in Zawiya, near the Libyan capital, ceased on Saturday evening thanks to tribal mediation. 

Libya has been struggling to recover from years of war and chaos following the 2011 uprising © Mena Today 

Violent clashes between rival armed groups in Zawiya, near the Libyan capital, ceased on Saturday evening thanks to tribal mediation. 

The confrontations, which erupted on Friday night, continued the following day in Zawiya, 45 kilometers west of Tripoli, resulting in "one death and several injuries as well as damage to homes and public buildings," according to a security directorate official who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Libya has been struggling to recover from years of war and chaos following the 2011 uprising. The country remains divided between a UN-recognized government based in Tripoli and a rival administration in the east. Despite a relative return to calm in recent years, periodic clashes continue to erupt among the myriad of armed groups present in the country.

The recent outbreak of violence in Zawiya underscores the ongoing instability in Libya. The fighting not only resulted in casualties but also caused significant damage to residential areas and public infrastructure, highlighting the fragile state of security in the region.

The cessation of hostilities through tribal mediation is a hopeful sign of the potential for local solutions to contribute to peace and stability. However, the underlying tensions between rival factions remain a significant challenge for Libya as it seeks to build a unified and peaceful nation.

While the immediate violence has been quelled, the incident in Zawiya serves as a stark reminder of the long road ahead for Libya. 

Continued efforts at both local and international levels are crucial for fostering lasting peace and stability in a country that has been marred by conflict for over a decade.

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